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The Bonneville Salt Flats - OU01D2

 The Need for Speed

Hidden by  Lord Mot

N 40° 45.761' W 113° 53.741' (WGS84)

 Coordinates in Other Systems
 Location: United States > Utah
 Cache Type: Unknown type
 Size: Very large
 Status: Ready for Search
 Date Hidden: 12 December 2010
 Date Created: 13 December 2010
 Last Modified: 13 December 2010
 Waypoint: OU01D2
 Also Listed On: Geocaching.com

 


{{found}} 0 x Found
{{not_found}} 0 x Did Not Find
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0 Watchers
1073 Visitors
0 x Rated
Rated as: N/A
GeoKrety History

Map
Available Maps: Opencaching,Google Maps

Description   EN   

The Bonneville Salt Flats
     width="600" />
Imagine a place so flat you seem to see the curvature of the
planet, so barren not even the simplest life forms can exist.
Imagine the passing thunder of strange vehicles hurtling by on a
vast dazzling white plain. This is not an alien world far from
earth; it is Utah's famous Bonneville Salt Flats.
The Bonneville Salt Flats is one of the most unique natural
features in Utah. Stretching over 30,000 acres, the Bonneville Salt
Flats is a fragile resource. It is located along I-80 near the
Utah-Nevada border. Wendover is the closest city. Thousands of
visitors, commercial filmmakers, and of course, high speed auto
racers, make the Bonneville Salt Flats a world famous
destination.
     width="600" />
 
 Racing For Speed
The Salt Flats are perhaps most famous for their use as the
Bonneville Speedway for high-speed race cars which have achieved
speeds in excess of 600 miles per hour (1000 km/h).
The Salt Flats' potential for racing was first recognized in 1896
by W.D. Rishel who was scouting a bicycle race course from New York
to San Francisco. Rishel returned and convinced daredevil Teddy
Tezlaff to attempt an automobile speed record on the flats. Tezlaff
drove a Blitzen Benz 141.73 m.p.h. to set an unofficial record in
1914.
The salt flats drew international attention in the 1930's when Utah
driver Ab Jenkins lured British racer Sir Malcolm Campbell to
compete for speed records on the salt surface. By 1949, the raceway
on the Bonneville Salt Flats was the standard course for world land
speed records. On this natural straightaway the 300, 400, 500, and
600 mile per hour land speed barriers were broken.
In the 1960's, jet powered vehicles and names like Craig Breedlove
(600.6 mph) and Art Arfons (576.55 mph) captured the imagination of
millions. In 1970, Gary Gabolich's rocket car, "Blue Flame",
attained a spectacular 622.4 miles per hour. Since the first speed
record attempts in 1914, hundreds of records have been set and
broken in a variety of automotive and motorcycle classes.
Typically, speed trials are scheduled throughout the summer and
fall at the Bonneville Raceway. Most events are open to the public.
The annual Speed Week is usually held in mid-August. 

A Barrier of Salt

Humans have lived in the Great Basin for thousands of years.
Excavations at nearby Danger Cave have proven occupation of the
area as early as 10,300 years ago. While Native Americans adapted
to the desert environment, more recent arrivals found the area less
hospitable.
By 1824, Jim Bridger and other mountain men explored the Great Salt
Lake desert region. The first recorded crossing of the desert was
made in 1845 by Captain John C. Fremont's survey party, with scouts
Kit Carson and Joe Walker. Early the next year, 23 year old
Lansford Hastings retraced Fremont's trail across the salt plain.
Joe Walker's writings warned emigrants not to attempt the untried
route; however, Hastings convinced several emigrant parties to
follow him. Despite Walker's warnings, the Donner-Reed party,
seeking a shortcut to California in 1846, attempted the "Hastings
Cutoff". They failed to take enough water and lost a critical
number of oxen. Four of their wagons were abandoned just 10 miles
northeast of the salt flats. Time was lost, and the delay resulted
in their late arrival to the Sierra Nevada Mountains and their
tragic winter. Later, in 1910, the first permanent crossing of the
Bonneville Salt Flats was completed when the Southern Pacific
Railroad was built linking Salt Lake City and San Francisco.
     width="500" />
 Ancient Lake Bonneville
Although he never visited the salt flats, the area is named in
honor of a gentleman whose expeditions in the 1830's proved the
area was part of an ancient basin.
During the last Ice Age, about 15,000 years ago, Lake Bonneville
was the size of Lake Michigan. It covered one-third of present day
Utah and parts of neighboring states. You can see traces of the
shorelines, representing different levels of the receding lake,
etched into the mountains surrounding the salt flats.
The Bonneville Salt Flats and the Great Salt Lake are remnants of
ancient Lake Bonneville. Wind and water combine to create the flat
surface of salt. Each winter, a shallow layer of standing water
floods the surface of the salt flats. During spring and summer, the
water slowly evaporates while winds smooth the surface into a vast,
nearly perfect flat plain. The salt surface contains potassium,
magnesium lithium and sodium chloride (common table salt).
 Pop Culture
Several movies have been filmed at the Salt Flats, including
portions of Independence Day, The Worlds Fastest Indian, and
Pirates of the Caribbean: at Worlds End.
Information provided courtesy of
www.utah.com

To get credit and claim a “Find” for this Cache you must

post a picture of yourself/s at the Bonneville Salt Flats sign at
the posted coordinates (not the sign pictured) and answer any three
questions from the list below. There is very little information on
the sign so Internet research may be required. Also, let us know
how many people were in your party. Please do not include your
answers on the Cache page.
#1: Tell us what the depth of the salt in many areas of the
Bonneville Salt Flats has been recorded at (How many feet or
meters)?
#2: Tell us the Date, Driver, Car Name and Speed of 5 past or
present Land Speed Record holders on the Bonneville Salt
Flats.
#3: Tell us how the Bonneville Salt Flats were formed and why there
is so much salt here.
#4: Tell us who the Bonneville Salt Flats and Lake Bonneville was
named after? What year were they born, what year did they die, and
what was their occupation?
The Bonneville Salt Flats

Imagine a place so flat you seem to see the curvature of theplanet, so barren not even the simplest life forms can exist.Imagine the passing thunder of strange vehicles hurtling by on avast dazzling white plain. This is not an alien world far from earth; it is Utah's famous Bonneville Salt Flats.
The Bonneville Salt Flats is one of the most unique naturalfeatures in Utah. Stretching over 30,000 acres, the Bonneville SaltFlats is a fragile resource. It is located along I-80 near theUtah-Nevada border. Wendover is the closest city. Thousands ofvisitors, commercial filmmakers, and of course, high speed autoracers, make the Bonneville Salt Flats a world famousdestination.


 
 Racing For Speed
The Salt Flats are perhaps most famous for their use as theBonneville Speedway for high-speed race cars which have achievedspeeds in excess of 600 miles per hour (1000 km/h).
The Salt Flats' potential for racing was first recognized in 1896by W.D. Rishel who was scouting a bicycle race course from New Yorkto San Francisco. Rishel returned and convinced daredevil TeddyTezlaff to attempt an automobile speed record on the flats. Tezlaffdrove a Blitzen Benz 141.73 m.p.h. to set an unofficial record in1914.
The salt flats drew international attention in the 1930's when Utahdriver Ab Jenkins lured British racer Sir Malcolm Campbell tocompete for speed records on the salt surface. By 1949, the racewayon the Bonneville Salt Flats was the standard course for world landspeed records. On this natural straightaway the 300, 400, 500, and600 mile per hour land speed barriers were broken.
In the 1960's, jet powered vehicles and names like Craig Breedlove(600.6 mph) and Art Arfons (576.55 mph) captured the imagination ofmillions. In 1970, Gary Gabolich's rocket car, "Blue Flame",attained a spectacular 622.4 miles per hour. Since the first speedrecord attempts in 1914, hundreds of records have been set andbroken in a variety of automotive and motorcycle classes.Typically, speed trials are scheduled throughout the summer andfall at the Bonneville Raceway. Most events are open to the public.The annual Speed Week is usually held in mid-August. 

A Barrier of Salt
Humans have lived in the Great Basin for thousands of years.Excavations at nearby Danger Cave have proven occupation of thearea as early as 10,300 years ago. While Native Americans adaptedto the desert environment, more recent arrivals found the area lesshospitable.
By 1824, Jim Bridger and other mountain men explored the Great SaltLake desert region. The first recorded crossing of the desert wasmade in 1845 by Captain John C. Fremont's survey party, with scoutsKit Carson and Joe Walker. Early the next year, 23 year oldLansford Hastings retraced Fremont's trail across the salt plain.Joe Walker's writings warned emigrants not to attempt the untriedroute; however, Hastings convinced several emigrant parties tofollow him. Despite Walker's warnings, the Donner-Reed party,seeking a shortcut to California in 1846, attempted the "HastingsCutoff". They failed to take enough water and lost a criticalnumber of oxen. Four of their wagons were abandoned just 10 milesnortheast of the salt flats. Time was lost, and the delay resultedin their late arrival to the Sierra Nevada Mountains and theirtragic winter. Later, in 1910, the first permanent crossing of theBonneville Salt Flats was completed when the Southern PacificRailroad was built linking Salt Lake City and San Francisco.






 Ancient Lake Bonneville
Although he never visited the salt flats, the area is named inhonor of a gentleman whose expeditions in the 1830's proved thearea was part of an ancient basin.
During the last Ice Age, about 15,000 years ago, Lake Bonnevillewas the size of Lake Michigan. It covered one-third of present dayUtah and parts of neighboring states. You can see traces of theshorelines, representing different levels of the receding lake,etched into the mountains surrounding the salt flats.
The Bonneville Salt Flats and the Great Salt Lake are remnants ofancient Lake Bonneville. Wind and water combine to create the flatsurface of salt. Each winter, a shallow layer of standing waterfloods the surface of the salt flats. During spring and summer, thewater slowly evaporates while winds smooth the surface into a vast,nearly perfect flat plain. The salt surface contains potassium,magnesium lithium and sodium chloride (common table salt).

 Pop Culture
Several movies have been filmed at the Salt Flats, includingportions of Independence Day, The Worlds Fastest Indian, andPirates of the Caribbean: at Worlds End.


Information provided courtesy ofwww.utah.com

To get credit and claim a “Find” for this Cache you mustpost a picture of yourself/s at the Bonneville Salt Flats sign atthe posted coordinates (not the sign pictured) and answer any threequestions from the list below. There is very little information onthe sign so Internet research may be required. Also, let us knowhow many people were in your party. Please do not include youranswers on the Cache page.

#1: Tell us what the depth of the salt in many areas of theBonneville Salt Flats has been recorded at (How many feet ormeters)?

#2: Tell us the Date, Driver, Car Name and Speed of 5 past orpresent Land Speed Record holders on the Bonneville SaltFlats.

#3: Tell us how the Bonneville Salt Flats were formed and why thereis so much salt here.

#4: Tell us who the Bonneville Salt Flats and Lake Bonneville wasnamed after? What year were they born, what year did they die, andwhat was their occupation?


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