Virtual
Task Difficulty: 1.5 Out of 5.0
Terrain Difficulty: 2.0 Out of 5.0
Statystyka skrzynki
Genesee County Alms House -Rolling Hills Asylum - OU02B8

 The Fourth of 3 new Caches in Genesee County Park

Hidden by  Sabrefan7

N 42° 52.441' W 78° 07.449' (WGS84)

 Coordinates in Other Systems
 Location: United States > New York
 Cache Type: Virtual
 Size: No container
 Status: Ready for Search
 Date Hidden: 03 June 2011
 Date Created: 01 June 2011
 Last Modified: 03 June 2011
 Waypoint: OU02B8

 


{{found}} 7 x Found
{{not_found}} 0 x Did Not Find
{{comment}} 0 Comments
0 Notes
0 Watchers
5063 Visitors
7 x Rated
Rated as: Good
GeoKrety History

Map
Available Maps: Opencaching,Google Maps

Cache Attributes

Kid Friendly Available in Winter In the Woods Limited Hours Listed on OCNA Only 

Please see the attributes article for more information.

Description   EN   

The cache will take you to the BLUE Trail Of Death. The coordinates are for a brass plate  on a stone for the Poor House Memorial. As some of you may know The Genesee County Poor House was Built in 1826. Here is a brief history.

By Susan L. Conklin, County Historian

An act to provide for the establishment of county poorhouses was passed in Albany in 1824. On December 4, 1826 the Genesee County Board of Supervisors met in Bethany for the purpose of establishing a County Poorhouse.  A brick building, originally a stagecoach tavern, located near the corner of the Bethany Center Road and Raymond Road was the site selected, as it represented the geographical center of the county. (Wyoming County wasn’t established until 1841.) The following official announcement, dated December 9, 1826, appeared in an issue of the Batavia Times newspaper:

“Notice is hereby given that the Genesee County Poorhouse will be ready for the reception of paupers on the first day of January 1827 … The Overseers of the Poor of the several towns of the County of Genesee are requested, in all cases of removal of paupers to the county poorhouse, to send with them their clothing, beds, bedding and such other articles belonging to the paupers as may be necessary and useful to them.”

The following were eligible for assistance: habitual drunkards, lunatics (one who by disease, grief or accident lost the use of reason or from old age, sickness or weakness was so weak of mind as to be incapable of governing or managing their affairs), paupers (a person with no means of income), state paupers (one who is blind, lame, old or disabled with no income source) or a vagrant.

Causes of pauperism are listed and in 1867 the Superintendent of the Poor reported that of the 1,018 poor, 706 had become paupers by intemperance (excessive drinking of alcoholic liquor).  Another document noted that a man had died leaving behind a widow and fatherless children and with no means of support the mother and children become residents of the County Home.

In 1828 the County constructed a stone building attached to the Poorhouse for the confinement of lunatics and a repository for paupers committed for misconduct.  The insane were also housed at the County Home until 1887 when the Board of Supervisors agreed to send “persons suffering with acute insanity to the Buffalo State Asylum and cases of violent, chronic insanity to Willard.

A list of those who died while living in the County Home was recently complied by the History Department staff.  Information was found in the Registration Books, the list of coffins purchased, mortuary listings and reports from the Superintendents of the Poor to the County Board of Supervisors.  Information on the cemetery located at the County Home is almost nonexistent.  The 1886 Proceedings stated “The burying ground we have improved by building a fence in front and grading and leveling the ground as much as could be done without injury to the graves.”  An actual cemetery register or plot map has yet to be discovered.  The County did bury those who had no family to care for the dead and the receipts provide us only with clues.

Occasionally an obituary will include information regarding an individual who once resided and died at the County Home.  Phebe White has the distinction of being an inmate for 58 years, having entered the County Home at the age of 9 in 1828, shortly after it opened.  She was listed as idiotic and at the age of 49 became blind.  Phebe was one of the first recipients of the care and protection provided by the County Home. The Superintendent of the Poor estimated her total care cost the county $7,000.  The 1871 Proceedings listed 146 persons had been provided for at a cost to keep each at $1.08 per week per resident.  The County Home included a working farm and woods which provided food and fuel, therefore the actual cost to care these individuals was low.

Causes of pauperism are listed and in 1867 the Superintendent of the Poor reported that of the 1,018 poor, 706 had become paupers by intemperance (excessive drinking of alcoholic liquor).  Another document noted that a man had died leaving behind a widow and fatherless children and with no means of support the mother and children become residents of the County Home.

In 1828 the County constructed a stone building attached to the Poorhouse for the confinement of lunatics and a repository for paupers committed for misconduct.  The insane were also housed at the County Home until 1887 when the Board of Supervisors agreed to send “persons suffering with acute insanity to the Buffalo State Asylum and cases of violent, chronic insanity to Willard.

A list of those who died while living in the County Home was recently complied by the History Department staff.  Information was found in the Registration Books, the list of coffins purchased, mortuary listings and reports from the Superintendents of the Poor to the County Board of Supervisors.  Information on the cemetery located at the County Home is almost nonexistent.  The 1886 Proceedings stated “The burying ground we have improved by building a fence in front and grading and leveling the ground as much as could be done without injury to the graves.”  An actual cemetery register or plot map has yet to be discovered.  The County did bury those who had no family to care for the dead and the receipts provide us only with clues.

Occasionally an obituary will include information regarding an individual who once resided and died at the County Home.  Phebe White has the distinction of being an inmate for 58 years, having entered the County Home at the age of 9 in 1828, shortly after it opened.  She was listed as idiotic and at the age of 49 became blind.  Phebe was one of the first recipients of the care and protection provided by the County Home. The Superintendent of the Poor estimated her total care cost the county $7,000.  The 1871 Proceedings listed 146 persons had been provided for at a cost to keep each at $1.08 per week per resident.  The County Home included a working farm and woods which provided food and fuel, therefore the actual cost to care these individuals was low.

This memorial is to All who passed.  Only a few makers remain. There is quite possibly  hundreds of unmarked graves of the unloved unclaimed and forgotten.

To claim your visit. Please enter the last name of the woman who died on June 29 1887 aged 70 y

 

 

For information on the haunted building please vist

http://rollinghillsasylum.vpweb.com/Rolling-Hills-Asylum.html

http://hubpages.com/hub/Rolling-Hills-Asylum

 Utilities

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Log Entries    {{found}} 7x {{not_found}} 0x {{comment}} 0x     Show All Log Entries   New Log Entry

1 16 August 2015 Bon Echo Found it

Headed south of the border again this weekend (well, actually a lot more east and just a bit south) but this time it was adults only, no kids (first time in 8 years that we've been able to say that). We traveled to the Finger Lakes area to enjoy a romantic anniversary weekend - by romantic, I mean stopping to find caches, garage sales, thrift shops, driving secondary highways, stuff like that.
We stopped into this park on our way home, and hit the Blue Death Row Trail (what a name!) to visit this virtual. there's just something about graveyards off in the woods. So few gravestones given what we read in the cache description. Wow, this brings the Oliver Twist story to life. After leaving the park, we stopped briefly outside the old asylum building. I'm all for creating ways to reuse a historical building, but not so sure I like the way it's being used now. Not that anyone asked my opinion.
In the end, we found 6 OCNA caches (and dnf'd two), also visited the oldest geocache in the state and picked up two other gc.com caches plus a few qualifiers for some TerraCaching locationless caches. A good weekend all around. Thanks Sabrefan7 for supplying 5 of the 6 OCNA caches that we found this weekend.
Headed south of the border again this weekend (well, actually a lot more east and just a bit south) but this time it was adults only, no kids (first time in 8 years that we've been able to say that). We traveled to the Finger Lakes area to enjoy a romantic anniversary weekend - by romantic, I mean stopping to find caches, garage sales, thrift shops, driving secondary highways, stuff like that.
We stopped into this park on our way home, and hit the Blue Death Row Trail (what a name!) to visit this virtual. there's just something about graveyards off in the woods. So few gravestones given what we read in the cache description. Wow, this brings the Oliver Twist story to life. After leaving the park, we stopped briefly outside the old asylum building. I'm all for creating ways to reuse a historical building, but not so sure I like the way it's being used now. Not that anyone asked my opinion.
In the end, we found 6 OCNA caches (and dnf'd two), also visited the oldest geocache in the state and picked up two other gc.com caches plus a few qualifiers for some TerraCaching locationless caches. A good weekend all around. Thanks Sabrefan7 for supplying 5 of the 6 OCNA caches that we found this weekend.

Bon Echo @ OU02B8

1 09 June 2014 Mr.Yuck Found it

Wow, what great history, and who would have thought you'd find a cemetery back there! I ran into a couple with a baby in one of those cool running and/or trail stollers, but I had the location to myself after they left. Very nicely maintained, and I read the whole description on the GPS before scrolling down to see what the log password was. Got that no problem. Also stumbled on the Rolling Hill Asylum itself on the way to the park, and took a pic and made it a Sight on Sighter, although my phone camera sucks. Outstanding cache here, thanks.
Pictures Connected with this Log Entry:
Boy my phone camera sucks. I should work on that.
Boy my phone camera sucks. I should work on that.

1 11 August 2012 Rayman Found it

Would you believe I had muggles to deal with at this cache? Oh, it's true. I should start out by saying that I thought I was looking for a physical cache here since I forgot to transfer all the OCUS caches from GSAK into my GPS, and of course Sprint reception is terrible at best out here in the park. So after seeing the muggles horsing around at GZ I decided to go find the froggy site caches and come back later.

I should also mention that since I didn't have the coords already in the GPS, I had to get them off the official OCUS app. Oddly enough, the app displays coords in decimal degrees, so I hope that wouldn't hinder my finding ability. After looking around for a few mintues for a physical cache, I was able to get one bar on the phone and fired up the app. Oh, it's a virtual! No wonder I couldn't find it! Once I saw what I needed, I was on my way. TFTC and bringing me to this hidden place.

1 16 July 2011 Borst68 Found it

Grabbed this as part of my 7 cache sojourn in this cool park.  Interesting history about this area.  Thanks for the history lesson and the virtual.

1 30 June 2011 JuniorNimrod Found it

Found with DudleyGrunt on day 1 of our GeoWoodstock based trip to NY and PA.  Interesting to find a cemetery in the middle of the woods like this.  Thanks.