Unknown type
Task Difficulty: 1.0 Out of 5.0
Terrain Difficulty: 1.0 Out of 5.0
Statystyka skrzynki
Devil's Slide - OU01D1

 A great natural wonder

Hidden by  Lord Mot

N 41° 03.820' W 111° 32.885' (WGS84)

 Coordinates in Other Systems
 Location: United States > Utah
 Cache Type: Unknown type
 Size: Very large
 Status: Ready for Search
 Date Hidden: 12 December 2010
 Date Created: 13 December 2010
 Last Modified: 13 December 2010
 Waypoint: OU01D1
 Also Listed On: Geocaching.com

 


{{found}} 3 x Found
{{not_found}} 0 x Did Not Find
{{comment}} 0 Comments
0 Notes
1 Watchers
2285 Visitors
2 x Rated
Rated as: N/A
GeoKrety History

Map
Available Maps: Opencaching,Google Maps

Description   EN   

Devil’s

   Slide
I have always been fascinated by this slide since I
was a little kid. Why take your kids to an ordinary playground
slide at the park, when you can go to the slide named after the
Devil himself? Unfortunately for sliders, Devils Slide is not a
real slide, but an unusual geologic feature found in northern Utah.
Devils Slide is a classic example of how different rock layers,
depending on their composition, are affected by weathering and
erosion.

 
"http://img.geocaching.com/cache/f67fb0f7-c306-4c32-849b-b47e6ae4dfab.jpg">


The sides of the slide are hard, weather-resistant
limestone layers about 40 feet high, 25 feet apart, and several
hundred feet in length. In between these two hard layers is a
softer limestone that is slightly different in composition from the
outer limestone layers. This middle layer is softer, which makes it
more susceptible to weathering and erosion, thus forming the chute
of the slide. Looking like a large playground slide fit only for
the Devil, this site is a tilted remnant of sediments deposited in
a sea that occupied Utah’s distant geologic past. Approximately 170
to 180 million years ago, a shallow sea originating from the north
spread south and east over areas of what are now Montana, Wyoming,
and Utah. This sea extended as far east as the present-day Colorado
River and south into northern Arizona. Over millions of years,
massive amounts of sediment accumulated and eventually formed
layers of limestone and sandstone. In northern Utah, these rocks
are known as the Twin Creek Formation and are approximately 2700
feet thick. About 75 million years ago, folding and faulting during
a mountain- building episode tilted the Twin Creek rock layers to a
near-vertical position. Subsequent erosion has exposed the
near-vertical rock layers and created Devils Slide. 

How to get to Devils Slide: 1. From the I-15/U.S.

Highway 89 interchange in Farmington; head north on U.S. Highway 89
for 10.7 miles to a sign indicating the route to Morgan and
Evanston. Turn right (east) on I-84 and travel approximately 23
miles to the scenic viewpoint turnoff located after milepost 110.
or 2. From the southern I-15/I-80 interchange in Salt Lake City;
head 11.3 miles east on I-80 to exit 134 (Mountain Dell Recreation
exit). Travel north on Utah State Highway 65 for 27.7 miles to the
town of Henefer. Turn left (west) and proceed 1 mile to I-84. Turn
left (west) onto I-84 and travel 2 miles to the scenic viewpoint
turnoff located just after milepost 111.


Information provided courtesy of
USG

To get credit and

claim a “Find” for this EarthCache you must post a picture of
yourself and your GPS in front of Devil’s Slide and send us: An
Email telling us what type of “softer” Limestone is on both sides
and within the center of the slide. (This information can also be
found online if not known). And tell us if you were to walk
directly up the Slide, what bearing would you be heading? And
provide us with an educated quess as to what the elevation gain is
from the bottom of the Slide to the top.
      Please do not include your
      answers on the Cache page.
Failure to complete a requirement from the list will result in your
log being deleted.

Devil’s   Slide

I have always been fascinated by this slide since Iwas a little kid. Why take your kids to an ordinary playgroundslide at the park, when you can go to the slide named after theDevil himself? Unfortunately for sliders, Devils Slide is not areal slide, but an unusual geologic feature found in northern Utah.Devils Slide is a classic example of how different rock layers,depending on their composition, are affected by weathering anderosion.

 


The sides of the slide are hard, weather-resistantlimestone layers about 40 feet high, 25 feet apart, and severalhundred feet in length. In between these two hard layers is asofter limestone that is slightly different in composition from theouter limestone layers. This middle layer is softer, which makes itmore susceptible to weathering and erosion, thus forming the chuteof the slide. Looking like a large playground slide fit only forthe Devil, this site is a tilted remnant of sediments deposited ina sea that occupied Utah’s distant geologic past. Approximately 170to 180 million years ago, a shallow sea originating from the northspread south and east over areas of what are now Montana, Wyoming,and Utah. This sea extended as far east as the present-day ColoradoRiver and south into northern Arizona. Over millions of years,massive amounts of sediment accumulated and eventually formedlayers of limestone and sandstone. In northern Utah, these rocksare known as the Twin Creek Formation and are approximately 2700feet thick. About 75 million years ago, folding and faulting duringa mountain- building episode tilted the Twin Creek rock layers to anear-vertical position. Subsequent erosion has exposed thenear-vertical rock layers and created Devils Slide. 

How to get to Devils Slide: 1. From the I-15/U.S.Highway 89 interchange in Farmington; head north on U.S. Highway 89for 10.7 miles to a sign indicating the route to Morgan andEvanston. Turn right (east) on I-84 and travel approximately 23miles to the scenic viewpoint turnoff located after milepost 110.or 2. From the southern I-15/I-80 interchange in Salt Lake City;head 11.3 miles east on I-80 to exit 134 (Mountain Dell Recreationexit). Travel north on Utah State Highway 65 for 27.7 miles to thetown of Henefer. Turn left (west) and proceed 1 mile to I-84. Turnleft (west) onto I-84 and travel 2 miles to the scenic viewpointturnoff located just after milepost 111.


Information provided courtesy ofUSG

To get credit andclaim a “Find” for this Cache you must post a picture ofyourself and your GPS in front of Devil’s Slide and send us: AnEmail telling us what type of “softer” Limestone is on both sidesand within the center of the slide. (This information can also befound online if not known). And tell us if you were to walkdirectly up the Slide, what bearing would you be heading? Andprovide us with an educated quess as to what the elevation gain isfrom the bottom of the Slide to the top.
      Please do not include your      answers on the Cache page.
Failure to complete a requirement from the list will result in yourlog being deleted.

 Utilities

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Log Entries    {{found}} 3x {{not_found}} 0x {{comment}} 0x      New Log Entry

1 15 May 2015 TommyGator Found it

We never encountered a geological feature like this before!  Glad a viewing area is provided so we could grab this one while traveling the interstate.  Some workers were doing some maintenance at the bottom of the slide---perhaps installing a gate on the dirt road that goes along the base. Email with answers has been sent---Thanks for bringing us here!
Pictures Connected with this Log Entry:
Big Slide
Big Slide

1 03 July 2014 tripman1 Found it

Found this near the end of our trip into Odgen,  Email sent, pictures to post when I have better internet access.  I'm trying to cover the semi in the photo, but not too successful.  Thanks for the hide.
Pictures Connected with this Log Entry:
Devil's Slide
Devil's Slide

1 30 April 2011 t3hflax0r Found it

I almost drove straight through the viewing area! After several unsuccessful photos trying to get everything in the frame just right in the cold wind, we came up with this: